Where to turn?

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When belief in God becomes difficult,
the tendency is to turn away from Him;
but in heaven’s name to what?

–C. K. Chesterton
(1874 – 1936)

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Published in: on 02/10/2013 at 4:29  Leave a Comment  
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When faith falters

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When belief in God becomes difficult,
the tendency is to turn away from Him;
but in heaven’s name to what?

–C. K. Chesterton

Published in: on 01/28/2013 at 3:07  Leave a Comment  
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The startling statement

Christ - light 3

It is quite unlike anything else. It is a thing final like the trump of doom though it is also a piece of good news; or news that seems too good to be true.

It is nothing less than the loud assertion
that this mysterious Maker of the world
has visited His world in person.

It declares that really and even recently, or right in the middle of historic times, there did walk into the world this original invisible being; about whom the thinkers make theories and the mythologists hand down myths; the Man who made the World. That such a higher personality exists behind all things had always been implied by the best thinkers as well as by all the beautiful legends. But nothing of this sort has ever been implied by any of them…

Christ speaking to followers B

The most that any religious prophet had said was that he was the true servant of such a being. The most that any visionary had ever said was that men might catch glimpses of the glory of that spiritual being; much more often of lesser spiritual beings. The most that any primitive myth had ever suggested was that the Creator was present at the Creation. But that the Creator was present at scenes a little subsequent to the supper-parties of Horace, and talked with tax collectors and government officials in the detailed daily life of the Roman Empire, and that this fact continued to be firmly asserted by the whole of that great civilization for more than a thousand years–that is something utterly unlike anything else in nature.

It is the one great startling statement
that man has made since he spoke
his first articulate word.

. . . It makes nothing but dust and nonsense of comparative religion.

–C. K. Chesterton, (1874 – 1936)
(Emphasis added)

Merciful and severe

The real problem is – Can the lion lie down with the lamb and still retain his royal ferocity? That is the problem the church attempted; that is the miracle she achieved. This is what I have called guessing the hidden eccentricities of life…Christian doctrine detected the oddities of life. It not only discovered the law, but it foresaw the exceptions. Those underrate Christianity who say that it discovered mercy; any one might discover mercy. In fact everyone did. But to discover a plan for being merciful and also severe – that was to anticipate a strange need of human nature…

–C.K. Chesterton

Published in: on 11/06/2012 at 7:22  Leave a Comment  
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It was His mirth

Joy, which was the small publicity of the Pagan, is the gigantic secret of the Christian. And as I close this chaotic volume [Orthodoxy], I open again the strange small book from which all Christianity came; and I am again haunted by a kind of confirmation.

This tremendous figure which fills the Gospels towers in this respect, as in every other, above all the thinkers who ever thought themselves tall.

His pathos was natural, almost casual. The Stoics, ancient and modern, were proud, proud of concealing their tears. He never concealed His tears; He showed them plainly on His open face at any daily sight, such as the far sight of His native city. Yet He concealed something . . .

Solemn Supermen and Imperial Diplomatists are proud of restraining their anger. He never restrained His anger. He flung furniture down from the steps of the Temple and asked men how they expected to escape the damnation of Hell. Yet He restrained something . . .

I say it with reverence — there was in that shattering personality a thread that must be called shyness.

There was something that He hid from all men when He went up a mountain to pray.

There was something that He covered constantly by abrupt silence or impetuous isolation.

There was some one thing that was too great for God to show us when He walked upon our earth, and I have sometimes fancied that it was His mirth.

–C. K. Chesterton

Published in: on 01/15/2011 at 21:36  Leave a Comment  
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