When Christ is accepted

images-1 copy

To “Accept Christ” is to know the meaning of the words “as He is, so are we in this world” (1 Jn. 4:17). We accept His friends as our friends, His enemies as our enemies, His ways as our ways, His rejection as our rejection, His cross as our cross. His life as our life and His future as our future.

–A. W. Tozer

Published in: on 08/05/2015 at 16:07  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , , ,

The “folly” of following Jesus


If the world is sane, then Jesus is mad as a hatter and the Last Supper is the Mad Tea Party. The world says, Mind your own business, and Jesus says, There is no such thing as your own business. The world says, Follow the wisest course and be a success, and Jesus says, Follow me and be crucified. The world says, Drive carefully — the life you save may be your own — and Jesus says, Whoever would save his life will lose it, and whoever loses his life for my sake will find it. The world says, Law and order, and Jesus says, Love. The world says, Get and Jesus says, Give. In terms of the world’s sanity, Jesus is crazy as a coot, and anybody who thinks he can follow him without being a little crazy too is laboring less under a cross than under a delusion.

—Frederick Buechner
Listening to Your Life

Heaven already inside


If you have really handed yourself over to Him it must follow that you are trying to obey Him. But trying in a new way, a less worried way. Not doing these things in order to be saved, but because He has begun to save you already. Not hoping to get Heaven as a reward for your actions, but inevitably wanting to act in a certain way because a first faint gleam of Heaven is already inside you.

–C. S. Lewis
Christian Behavior

A New Epicenter


At the Sea of Galilee, Christ called to the disciples to follow him. And they did so, leaving behind their boats and businesses. They were so taken with Christ that they never felt the cost of their renunciation. They walked in the epicenter of a new adoration that had silently slain their old affections. Renunciation that is self-aware is mere asceticism, subtly boasting its own magnificent sacrifice.

divider-1 copy 2

The apostles came to Christ, having surrendered the possessions that stood between them and the will of God. Even so, we do not remember them because they chose poverty, but because they adored Christ. If we too are spellbound by His excellence, relinquishment will be more a byproduct of devotion than a prerequisite of it.

divider-1 copy 2

True lovers of Christ can stand in the pain of self denial . . . The glory of the Spirit blinds them to the showy temporal treasures of earth. They see only the Host. His hands are bruised and scarred; his once broken fingers now break the loaf.

–Calvin Miller
Table of Inwardness

Following Jesus

Footsteps 2

Following Jesus is the yes that comes after the no. We have renounced self-initiative for Jesus obedience. We have renounced clamoring assertion and replaced them with quiet listening. We watch Jesus work. We listen to Jesus speak. We accompany Jesus into new relationships, odd places, odd people. We pray our prayers in Jesus’ name. Keeping company with Jesus, observing what he does, and listening to what he says develops into a life of answering God, a life of responding to God, which is a life of prayer.Page-divider

Following Jesus is not a robotic lockstep, marching in a straight line after Jesus. The following gets inside of us, becomes internalized, gets into our muscles and nerves. It’s much more like a ramble, and it becomes prayer.

Prayer is what develops in us after we step out of the center and begin responding to the center, to Jesus.

–Eugene Peterson
Living the Resurrection

Call us back

lovegod 2

Come, Lord,
stir us up, call us back.
Kindle and seize us.
Be our fire and our sweetness.
Let us love. Let us run.

–St. Augustine

Published in: on 09/18/2013 at 4:34  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , ,

Bold believers

climbing n

In vain I have searched the Bible, looking for examples of early believers whose lives were marked by rigidity, predictability, inhibition, dullness, and caution.

Fortunately, grim, frowning,
joyless saints in Scriptures
are conspicuous by their absence.

Instead, the examples I find are of adventurous, risk-taking, enthusiastic, and authentic believers whose joy was contagious even in times of full trial. Their vision was broad even when death drew near. Rules were few and changes were welcome. The contrast between then and now is staggering.

–Charles Swindoll

Stepping out of the parade

Young man looking down3

The moment we make up our minds that we are going on with this determination to exalt God overall, we step out of the world’s parade… We acquire a new viewpoint; a new and different psychology will be formed within us; a new power will begin to surprise us by its upsurgings and its outgoings.

–A. W. Tozer
The Pursuit of God

Belief or faith?


The Reformational paradigm, which tempts us to replace relationships with reason, is captured in the word belief. It is concerned with right thinking and adherence to a particular way of articulating biblical teaching. It involves systematizing and assenting—and excluding those who don’t fully subscribe to the current fashion in creedal statements. Belief is inert. It is intellectual, defensible . . .

In contrast, the missional paradigm is a way of life—the life of faith. It is a quest for discovery. It is nothing less than the pursuit of the GodLife relationship.


Faith is kinetic and transformational.
It is described in Scripture as following,
forgiving, seeking, rejoicing, sharing.

It is the life of relating to God, to others, and to God’s creation. To the Western mind it can appear sloppy and unpredictable and meandering. Yes, it is all of those things, and much more!

Belief is Plato; faith is Jesus.

–Leonard Sweet
Out of the Question . . . Into the Mystery
(emphasis added)

The commitment of faith

Autumn trail

Faith is not only a commitment
to the promises of Christ;
faith is also a commitment
to the demands of Christ.

–William Barclay, (1907 – 1978)

A holy adventure

Road Home-744913 C

At the edge of the map, a holy adventure awaits. A movement of love is rising in those who will choose to lay down their lives each day, becoming the expression of God’s grace and goodness to the people. He brings them… We are invited to join a global tribe of sons and daughters of their Father in heaven…

We are called to be a part of the coming
of an upside-down, inside out Kingdom
where the last are first and
the greatest are servants . . .

We have only one life to give, so we give it away extravagantly, hilariously, without reserve.

–Michelle Perry

Costly grace

Costly grace is the hidden treasure in the field, the costly pearl for which I am willing to sell everything. It is the call of Christ that makes me leave the nets and follow him. Costly because it calls to discipleship, grace because it calls to discipleship with Jesus; costly because it will cost my life; grace because it by the same token gives me my life. Costly because it cost God his only Son, and what has been costly for God cannot be cheap for us. Grace because the price has been paid and I can go free.

–Knud Jørgensen 

%d bloggers like this: