The fairy tale that’s true

Castle

It is a world of magic and mystery, of deep darkness and flickering starlight. It is a world where terrible things happen and wonderful things too. It is a world where goodness is pitted against evil, love against hate, order against chaos, in a great struggle where often it is hard to be sure who belongs to which side because appearances are endlessly deceptive. Yet for all its confusion and wildness, it is a world where the battle goes ultimately to the good, who live happily ever after, and where in the long run everybody, good and evil alike, becomes known by his true name… That is the fairy tale of the Gospel with, of course, one crucial difference from all other fairy tales, which is that the claim made for it is that it is true, that it not only happened once upon a time but has kept on happening ever since and is happening still.

–Frederick Buechner
Telling the Truth
(emphasis added)

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Tender and terrible

I want neither a terrorist spirituality that keeps me in a perpetual state of fright about being in right relationship with my heavenly Father nor a sappy spirituality that portrays God as such a benign teddy bear that there is no aberrant behavior or desire of mine that he will not condone. I want a relationship with the Abba of Jesus, who is infinitely compassionate with my brokenness and at the same time an awesome, incomprehensible, and unwieldy Mystery.

–Brennan Manning

Becoming like children

Jesus tells us . . . “Become like children.” Yet we know this is impossible. In the very effort of trying to become like children . . . we put our goal still farther out of reach. But it is precisely here, perhaps, that we come as near to the heart of the mystery as we are able.

It is just when we realize that it is impossible by
any effort of our own to make ourselves children
and thus to enter the kingdom of Heaven
that we become children.

We are children, perhaps, at the very moment when we know that it is as children that God loves us—not because we have deserved his love and not in spite of our undeserving, not because we try and not because we recognize the futility of our trying; but simply because he has chosen to love us . . . as children, through Jesus Christ our Lord.

–Frederick Buechner

Love’s mystery

“Perfect love casts out fear” (1 John 4:18).

Love should cast out terror, but it should not cast out awe. True love includes awe. This is one of the great secrets of sex and marriage that our age has tragically forgotten: awe at the mystery that sex is. Science has not explained away this mystery, nor has psychology. No true mystery is ever explained away. Sex, death, love, evil, beauty life, the soul, God—these remain forever infinite mysteries that we can never exhaust and should not want to. They are like the ocean, for us to swim in, not like a glass of water for us to drink and drain dry.

God is love, And love is not “luv.” Luv is nice; love is not nice. Love is a fire, a hurricane, an earthquake, a volcano, a bolt of lightning. Love is what banged out the big bang in the beginning, and love is what went to hell for us on the cross…

Perfect love casts out fear, but unless we begin with fear, we cannot progress to perfect love. Fear is the caterpillar, love is the butterfly.

–Peter Kreeft

The mystery of milk

Look at those cows and remember that the greatest scientists in the world have never discovered how to make grass into milk.

–Michael Pupin

Published in: on 11/27/2011 at 7:34  Leave a Comment  
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Surrounded by mystery

We are so impressed by scientific clank that we feel we ought not to say that the sunflower turns because it knows where the sun is. It is almost second nature to us to prefer explanations . . . with a large vocabulary. We are much more comfortable when we are assured that the sunflower turns because it is heliotropic. The trouble with that kind of talk is that it tempts us to think that we know what the sunflower is up to. But we don’t. The sunflower is a mystery, just as every single thing in the universe is.

–Robert Farrer Capon

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